Advances in the rheology of natural multiphase silicate melts: Import for magma transport and lava flow emplacement

Main Article Content

Daniele Giordano
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1271-5516

Abstract

A review of recent advances in the field of rheology of multicomponent silicate melts an multiphase silicate melt suspensions is presented here. The advances include the development of new experimental devices and field and remote sensing methods for measuring the rheologicalproperties of natural melts and magmas. The data obtained from these new technologies serve now as the basis for combining laboratory experiments, theoretical models, numerical simulations and remote sensing data derived from ground, airborne and satellite-based tools in order to model the physico-chemical evolution of magmas during ascent and eruption. These promising approaches combine laboratory experiments, theoretical models, numerical simulations and remote sensing data derived from ground, airborne and satellite-based tools. Each of these sub-disciplines has evolvedrapidly in recent years and the growing range of complementary data appears now to provide anopportunity for the development of multi-disciplinary research. Ultimately, these multidisciplinary initiatives seek to provide near-real-time forecasting of hazardous volcanic processes such as lavaflow field evolution. The results and approaches described here focus on multiphase (i.e. melts,bubbles, crystals) rheology of natural systems and are pertinent to the effusive emplacement of lavas, dykes and sills, as well as, to the eruption dynamics attendi explosive eruptions.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Giordano D. Advances in the rheology of natural multiphase silicate melts: Import for magma transport and lava flow emplacement. Ann. Geophys. [Internet]. 2019Nov.21 [cited 2022Jan.22];62(2):VO216. Available from: https://www.annalsofgeophysics.eu/index.php/annals/article/view/7859
Section
Special Issue: MeMoVolc
Author Biography

Daniele Giordano, 1) Università degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Via Valperga Caluso 35, 10125 Torino, Italy 2) Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia-Sezione di Pisa, Via della Faggiola, 32, 56126 Pisa, Italy. 3) Institute of Geoscience and Earth Resources (IGG-CNR), Italian National Research Council (CNR), Pisa, Italy;

Researcher at the Earth Sciences Department of the University of Turin;

Researxh associate at the INGV Pisa (PI), Italy;

Research associate at the CNR-IGG, Pisa (PI), Italy

Most read articles by the same author(s)